Imran Qureshi at the Met

Ken Johnson, for the NYTimes and Robin Cembalest for ArtNews review Imran Qureshi's commissioned project for the Met's rooftop  And How Many Rains Must Fall Before the Stains Are Washed Clean. After the playground type atmosphere of past projects on the rooftop, Qureshi gets beyond the spectacle and engages with the world as it is.

“These forms stem from the effects of violence,” he explains in a statement posted by the museum. “They are mingled with the color of blood, but, at the same time, this is where a dialogue with life, with new beginnings and fresh hope starts.”
It’s an obvious metaphor. From death grows life; from horror comes transcendence; hope emerges from despair. But for me and, I imagine, others, that inspirational symbolism will be overlaid by the sobering, still-fresh memories of the blood-splattered street where bombs exploded at the finish line of last month’s marathon in Boston. Thoughts of war and other terrorist acts naturally come to mind, too. Mr. Qureshi’s title, “And How Many Rains Must Fall Before the Stains Are Washed Clean,” from a poem by the Urdu poet Faiz Ahmed Faiz (1911-1984), underlines the deeply plaintive mood animating his piece.  
more from Ken Johnson's review
Imran Qureshi, And How Many Rains Must Fall before the Stains Are Washed Clean, installation view, detail, 2013, acrylic.

Imran Qureshi, And How Many Rains Must Fall before the Stains Are Washed Clean, installation view, 2013, acrylic.

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