Painting isn't for Everyone...Eight Painters

Paul Benke curated an exhibition Eight Painters for Markel. Brett Baker interviewed the curator about the project, his decision not to create a thematic exhibition, the cultural capabilities of painting and more. I was particularly interested in the following..

Baker.....You even go as far as to suggest that viewers “must be susceptible” to appreciate the “full power and subtleties” of the work.
Benke: Yes, painting isn’t for everyone. I see painting, today, as a radical act. And despite what we see, in our corner of the art world in Bushwick at the moment, the type of visual experience that abstract painting provides seems to be less in demand. But this is true with many good and important things. Poetry and Jazz are two. That doesn’t mean that these things aren’t vital or shouldn’t be valued. Of course they should.
Look, painting is difficult and it requires effort of the viewer. It requires work and enough interest and curiosity in what you are looking at to go out of your way and to invest something of yourself.
Luckily, there are viewers out there who are susceptible and open and hungry for the power, subtleties, and connection that abstract paintings offer. And even more importantly, there are many, many artists who are drawn to paint and feel that it best conveys their intention and vision.

Installation view: (Karl Bielik and Paul Behnke) Eight Painters at Kathryn Markel Fine Arts, New York
Installation view: (Karl Bielik and Paul Behnke) Eight Painters at Kathryn Markel Fine Arts, New York

Paul Behnke, Robert Taylor's Helmet, 2013, Acrylic on canvas, 48 x 50 in.

Karl Bielik, Lollipop, 2012
Oil on canvas, 67 x 79 in.

James Erikson, Being There, 2013, Oil on linen, 54 x 64 in.

Dale McNeil, Assimilation Power Form v. 8, 2013, Oil on canvas, 42 x 36 in.

Julie Torres, White Heat, 2013, acrylic on panel, 9 x 9 in.

Comments

Popular Posts