Frank Stella, finally

Frank Stella, Harran II, 1967. Polymer and fluorescent polymer paint on canvas. 120 × 240 in. (304.8 × 609.6 cm). Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; gift, Mr. Irving Blum, 1982. © 2015 Frank Stella/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
Frank Stella, Harran II, 1967. Polymer and fluorescent polymer paint on canvas. 120 × 240 in. (304.8 × 609.6 cm). Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; gift, Mr. Irving Blum, 1982. © 2015 Frank Stella/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

I've been a little slow posting on the Frank Stella exhibition at the Whitney. Maybe because he's too much, maybe his invention over powers me. Sometimes his direction just pisses me off, he digs deep into a idea and then like a flighty kid completely switches gears like he's running through a candy isle and grabbing at anything that sticks. More frustrating though is how often he's just so good!

Here's an except from Roberta Smiths NYTimes Review.
Mr. Stella works in series that sometimes run parallel, each putting a specific formal scheme through its paces, using titles that pull in history, geography, literature, music, zoology. The selection here represents, with at least one but often several works, about 25 of his estimated 50 or so series.  more
Frank Stella, Gobba, zoppa e collotorto, 1985. Oil, urethane enamel, fluorescent alkyd, acrylic,
and printing ink on etched magnesium and aluminum


Frank Stella, “Das Erdbeben in Chili [N#3]” (1999), acrylic on canvas, 144 x 486 inches.
Private collection (all photos by the author for Hyperallergic)


Frank Stella, The Whiteness of the Whale (IRS-1, 2X), 1987. Paint on aluminum
A selection of drawings.Credit2015 Frank Stella/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; Hiroko Masuike/The New York Times
Frank Stella, Installation View (White Whale on right)





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